Video Editing

We hope you and your family are safe and healthy during these uncertain times. The health and safety of our team and our clients is our top concern during the current pandemic.
Creative Liquid has provided video production services to the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation for several years. Each spring the Foundation honors citizen heroes. Our team produces a profile video of each honoree. This video was produced in early 2019.
The Maryland Charity Campaign is a workplace charitable giving program that offers State employees and eligible retirees the opportunity to contribute to charities using the convenience of payroll deduction. Creative Liquid produced this video to promote the 2017 campaign.
The Fly Life is a social media video series created in partnership with our client CLS Strategies. The videos feature employees at major airlines and cargo carriers. The goal of the series is to raise awareness and promote careers in the aviation industry.
Budgeting any project can be a struggle, especially when it comes to video. Many people have a difficult time wrapping their heads around the costs associated with producing a video. The key to getting the results you want are putting together a budget that best fits the end goal. If you want an 8K crane shot of Times Square with your company’s logo superimposed on every screen, but you don’t have the budget to hire the camera, crane operator or shut down NYC traffic, you may have to rethink why that shot is important to the story you’re telling. But, if you want your video to convey a sense of elegance and style through smooth camera movements, it’s much easier to budget for a video with that in mind. So how should you start budgeting your project?
It’s rare that an image comes to me in my edit suite that couldn’t be improved with a little color grading. Color grading is kind of like the icing on the cake. It’s the final pass that an editor will do on your video, going through shot by shot to tweak, correct, enhance or stylize your footage.
I was recently asked to define "high-quality video" and it got me thinking: Shouldn't all video be quality video? Do you need the qualifier high? Regardless there are some ways to define quality or high-quality video.
There’s a long standing joke in filmmaking: “We’ll fix it in post.” It’s a cringeworthy phrase that you’ll hear on set when a crew runs into frustrations with lighting or audio or an interview subject. It basically means, “we’ll fix it after the fact,” or, “we’ll find the story we need in the editing room.” Nobody wants to “fix it in post,” especially not your editor. Say that phrase near an editing suite and watch your editor’s eyes glaze over as they imagine 100 different ways they’d like to throttle the video crew.